Pakistan seeks consultant bids for 11.5-MW Ranolia Khwar

Pakistan’s Northwest Frontier Province (NWFP) seeks bids from consultants for management, design, and supervision of the 11.5-MW Ranolia Khwar hydroelectric project in NWFP. Proposals are due November 24.

NWFP’s executing agency, Sarhad Hydel Development Organization (SHYDO), sent the solicitation in October to six short-listed firms that responded to a call for expressions of interest. (HNN 7/21/08)

SHYDO said it wants consultants to evaluate and prepare a short list of engineering-procurement-construction contractors; prepare tender documents; review designs and evaluate cost proposals, financing arrangements, and condition of repayment; review power purchase agreements; and monitor and supervise construction and procurement.

It identified the short-listed firms:
o Fichtner GmbH Co., in association with Pakistan Engineering Services and National Development Consultants;
o GEO Consult zt GmbH of Austria, in association with International Expert Group for Hydropower Development of Germany, CIV-TECH, and Engineering Planning and Architectural Consultant;
o Genivar of Canada;
o Sheladia Inc. Co. of the United States, in association with AGES and Infra-D Consultants; and
o Associated Consulting Engineers – ACE (Pvt.) Ltd. of Pakistan, in association with ILF Consulting Engineer of Austria.

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) is funding a renewable energy development sector investment program for Pakistan, including construction of hydro projects and a wind farm. Last year, ADB lent Pakistan US$510 million under the program for a series of small hydropower project �clusters� to be built in NWFP and Punjab Province.

Proposals from the short-listed firms are due November 24. For information, contact Project Manager Wajid Nawaz Khan, Sarhad Hydel Development Organization (SHYDO), Room 365, WAPDA House, Shami Road, Peshawar, Pakistan; (92) 91-9212034; Fax: (92) 91-9211988; E-mail: wajidnawaz63@yahoo.com.

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