Mojave Water Agency to build 820-kW Deep Creek small hydroelectric project

The Mojave Water Agency announces it broke ground July 26 on its 820-kW Deep Creek small hydroelectric project in the U.S. state of California.

This project, anticipated to cost $4.3 million to build, is projected to save the agency millions of dollars over the next 30 years. It is expected to be complete in spring 2019.

Deep Creek will import water from the California Aqueduct to the groundwater basin in the Victor Valley area. The 820-kW turbine-generator unit can process nearly 4 billion gallons of water per year at a maximum flow rate of 20 cubic feet per second. Installed in an existing pipeline, the unit will control the flow of water and produce electricity that will offset MWA’s operating costs and provide power to Southern California Edison’s grid.

“This new hydroelectric system builds on the success of the Regional Recharge and Recovery Project by adding a clean energy component that brings cost savings,” said Kimberly Cox, MWA board president. “We’re taking an existing project that delivers drinking water, and now we’re going to generate renewable energy. This combination of innovation and efficiency will benefit the environment and our communities. It’s a smart way to ensure sustainability.”

The Deep Creek project will offset 4,540 metric tons of carbon dioxide and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from 972 passenger vehicles, according to a press release. In addition, the project qualifies for California’s renewable portfolio standard as an eligible project to help the state reach its goal of 50% renewable energy by 2030.

MWA says project partners include Kiewit Infrastructure, NLine Energy, Canyon Industries and SCE.

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Elizabeth Ingram is content director for the Hydro Review website and HYDROVISION International. She has more than 17 years of experience with the hydroelectric power industry. Follow her on Twitter @ElizabethIngra4 .

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