Seabased wave energy technology to be installed in Canary Islands

Seabased of Sweden announces it is teaming with Infocom Connect to provide wave energy for commercial projects in the Canary island, beginning with a 5-MW pilot installation to provide electricity for a desalination plant.

The Canary Islands off the coast of Spain rely heavily on diesel to fuel homes and businesses, Seabased says. One of the heaviest consumers of power is desalination plants, needed because the islands have limited fresh water. SBH Hotels and Resorts developed this plan in a move to replace fossil fuels such as diesel with renewable energy.

“I am deeply invested in the future of the Canary Islands and am excited about the potential of wave energy in this area,” said Oscar Sanchez, executive manager of SBH Hotels and Resorts. “We have slightly less than 3,000 square miles of land mass and it makes perfect sense to get our power from the waves. I see enormous potential of using wave energy not just for specific projects, like desalination, but ultimately to provide power for hotels and the grid itself, which should be less expensive than fossil fuels.” Sanchez’ family also owns a desalination plant with a capacity of 5,000 cubic meters.

Infocom Connect is a telecommunications company that operates largely in the Middle East, Africa, and India, and the company is moving into the renewable energy industry, Seabased says.

The technology consists of buoys that transmit the energy through a steel line to generators on the seabed and from there through cables to a switchgear. Seabased says this installation could expand to address multiple energy needs, such as automobile recharging stations or supplying electricity to the grid.

Recently, Seabased also signed a deal for the design, manufacture and installation of a 100-MW wave energy project off the coast of Ada Foah in Ghana.

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Elizabeth Ingram is content director for the Hydro Review website and HYDROVISION International. She has more than 17 years of experience with the hydroelectric power industry. Follow her on Twitter @ElizabethIngra4 .

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